Lea Bank Energy Park

About the Lea Bank Energy Park

The project

Emsrayne Renewable Energy Limited is proposing to develop Lea Bank Energy Park at a green field site off Lower Harpenden Road (B653) at New Mill End near East Hyde edged in red on the proposed location map (PDF 1.3MB) .

The project would involve the development of a combined heat and power (CHP) plant capable of accepting up to 500,000 tonnes p.a. of refuse derived fuel or similar ‘residual’ waste (non-hazardous, combustible mixed waste which remains after off-site recycling.) The CHP plant would utilise an industrial moving grate combustion technology to generate up to 49.99 MW of energy which would be transferred by means of new underground pipeline and cable to a connection point close to London Luton Airport to supply electricity and heat to existing and proposed businesses, local homes and the National Grid.   

Current position

At this stage, no planning application has been submitted. The developer has, however, requested that we provide a ‘Scoping Opinion’. Planning applications for certain major projects such as this, need to be accompanied by an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) which would assess the significant environmental effects that the development could potentially give rise to. A ‘Scoping Opinion’ provides local planning authorities with the opportunity to advise prospective applicants on the range of significant environmental topics and issues which should be taken into account when preparing an EIA for a particular project.

In preparing a Scoping Opinion, we consult with a wide range of internal and external technical specialists and organisations. Our Scoping Opinion was issued on 31 August 2018.

View the scoping documents online (link opens in new window)

The developer has set up a dedicated website for the Lea Bank Energy Park (link opens in new window), which contains further, detailed, information on the project.

Enquiries to the developer can be sent to: info@lbep.uk

Next steps

Now we've issued our Scoping Opinion, the developer needs to take that advice into account in preparing its EIA to accompany any future planning application. Such an application would be subject to an extensive publicity and consultation exercise when members of the public would be able to view the application documents and submit representations.

The application would ultimately be reported to our Development Management Committee for determination, although the possibility exists for large projects to be ‘called in’ by the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government for his own determination

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